Triffid – beaded sculpture

Took me a while to absorb what the email was telling me but eventually it dawned – my entry into Bead Dreams 2018 had been juried into the competition. Holy Cow!

You can imagine the butterflies in my stomach while trying to get the critter safely boxed up and ready for mailing.

Triffid by Rose Rushbrooke. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.
Triffid by Rose Rushbrooke

The whole piece was put together in sections. The flower and stem, the venomous stinger, the 3 claws at the base of the stem, the body, and the ground base. Some of the work was planned, and some I just prayed.

Here is the statement which accompanied the piece:

IS IT REAL? OR IS IT SCIENCE FICTION?

The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham
The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham

The Day of the Triffids, written by John Wyndham in 1951 was one of the first science fiction books I read and decades later the story still haunts me.
You awake one night to watch a dramatic green meteor shower in the sky, and the next morning you’ve gone blind. Sooooo not cool.
And to top it all, suddenly 7 foot tall, man-eating, walking plants are striding around your streets. Holy Cow! One strike from the venomous stinger and you’re a goner.
Strictly speaking, a Triffid is probably a bio-engineered, carnivorous critter and not an extra-terrestrial. But this is speculation. It’s never made clear in the book where the original Triffids came from, or the green meteor shower.
Whatever the truth (and it is ‘Out There’ – for X-Files fanatics), the Triffids are my favourite possible ET’s.

I’ve not done bead embroidery before so this was a good excuse to see what all the Sherri Serafini type fuss was about. I enjoyed finding special beads and rummaging through my seed bead stash for interesting colours. The design came easily as it is curved sections and each one got filled in as I went along.

Bead embroidered base of Triffid by Rose Rushbrooke. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.
Bead embroidered base of Triffid.

These vintage chartreuse wire balls were sooooo perfect. They look like tumble weeds. I found them, along with the looooong bugle beads, in Bead Bullies, a terrific bead shop in Tigard, Oregon. Wish I drove, I would be there all the time. Such a great shop.

Close up of Triffid base. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.
Close up of Triffid base.

I found all sorts of ways to use Czech glass beads, tilas, lentils, spikes. All a challenge and amazing colours. And finally I found a way to use the dragonfly button.

Closeup of Triffid base. Beaded sculpture by Rose Rushbrooke. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.
Closeup of Triffid base.

I managed to squeeze in ammonites, more bugle beads, and a funny little nest of interesting round beads. The basket weave worked out pretty well.

Triffid flower, stem and venomous stinger.  Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.
Triffid flower, stem and venomous stinger.

The whole thing is made around a coat hanger, styrofoam ball, and cardboard! The stitching for the stinger is herringbone, and the flower and stem are peyote stitch. I tried to grade the colours on both the stem and flower to give some dimension.

Still taken from Facebook video taken at Bead and Button show 2018 Bead Dreams showcases.
Still taken from Facebook video taken at Bead and Button show 2018 Bead Dreams showcases.

All in all, I’m very happy with this piece, and even happier it was selected for Bead Dreams 2018. This is a still from the Facebook video.

Pebble Bracelet – beading pattern available

Pebble Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke
Pebble Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke

I am totally enamoured with the Picasso finish on many styles of beads. This bracelet uses seed beads and fire polish crystals. They are such lovely earthy colours and together they make a subtle statement. This bracelet is fastened with a snap clasp and is made with 8 components and 2 end circles for the snaps. I like working in components as it means you can take your work anywhere and make one piece at a time before putting it together.

If you would like to buy this pattern you can find it under Pebble Bracelet or the Pattern section of my beadwork website.

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Beaded Horn of Plenty and necklace

Horn of Plenty basket containing necklace. Beadweaving - seed beads, fire polish crystals, delicas, Swarovski rivolis, and wirework. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.
The initial design of this 3-D piece began at a Masterclass with Nancy Cain at the Milwaukee Bead and Button Show.

I got stuck on filling it with the conventional fruits and veggies. However, common sense prevailed and I made a delicate necklace for the bounty spilling out of a basket.

Horn of Plenty basket - peyote beadweaving. Made with seed beads and Swarovski glass pearls. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.The basket is shaped peyote using seed beads, pearls and coloured wirework.

Horn of Plenty necklace - beadweaving. Made with seed beads, drops, fire polish crystals, and Swarovski rivolis. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.The necklace is made with bezelled Swarovski crystals and a daisy chain fastened with a silver and Swarovski clasp.

Cobalt Picasso Tile Superduo Bracelet

Cobalt Picasso Tile and superduo bracelet with ceramic clasp. Beadwork - peyote stitch. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.

Can you tell I like making these bracelets? I’ve made them in 3 different colorways and I’ve still got some more ideas. The new picasso finish – which is turning up on all types of beads – really appeals. And when they are paired up with peacock tiles – well……., yum.

Flat view of Cobalt Picasso Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.

This is what the bracelet looks like lying out flat. It’s 8″ long from the tip of the toggle to the clasp, and is 1″ wide. It fits a wrist diameter of just over 7″.

Back view of Cobalt Picasso Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.

Here’s a back view so you can see how pretty the beads are together.

Top view of Cobalt Picasso Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet. Image copyright © Rose Rushbrooke.

And this shows you the lovely ceramic clasp made by Jennifer Davies-Razor.

Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet

Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke
Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke

Here is a tile superduo clasp bracelet in another colourway. I am thoroughly enamored with the new picasso finish on today’s beads. And I like the peacock finish on tiles and drops. In this instance the turquoise superduo double hole beads go with the slightly greenish, creamish, brownish picasso tile beads.

I think it has something to do with the earthiness – the beads look like polished stones.

Back view of Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke
Back view of Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke

And of course, it is all helped along by using one of Jenny Davies-Razor’s ceramic rings. Again, total love affair going on here.

Top view of Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke
Top view of Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke

Just can’t stop photographing this thing.

Top view of Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke
Top view of Turquoise Tile Superduo Clasp Bracelet by Rose Rushbrooke

The bracelet is 8″ long from the tip of the toggle to the clasp, and is 1″ wide. It fits a wrist diameter of just over 7″.

And don’t forget it comes in Stone.